Ageing without Children – it’s an inequalities issue

Read any report on inequalities on ageing and you’ll see many of the same things: the adverse impact of being isolated with poor support networks, loneliness, having poor health and a low income. Certain groups will be highlighted as being particularly at risk, carers for example, people from the LGBT communities, people with disabilities. However,…

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Press Release – 6 February 2019

Ageing Well Without Children launches new website and guide ‘It’s a constant battle to get any help for my mum even though she’s in her 80s and has dementia. I feel like I’m always having to shout really loudly to get anywhere. I wonder, who will be shouting for me? Or will I be the…

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An AWOC take on “Care”

Last night BBC 1 showed “Care” which told the story of Jenny a single mother and her sister Claire struggling to care for her widowed mother Mary after she has a sudden stroke which leaves her unable to communicate properly and with vascular dementia. This blog gives an AWOC take on what unfolds (spoilers ahead).…

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What happens when the Carers are gone?

It is Carers Week, the time to highlight the work of the unpaid carers that prop up the health and social care system. Everywhere there are articles pointing out how much unpaid carers save the state and how much the system would collapse without them, which is 100% true. Without them services would implode under…

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We’re still here!

Dear AWOC members and supporters, Looking back at 2017, one of the most remarkable thing for us is that AWOC is still here. We started the year with high hopes of receiving a grant from the Big Lottery Accelerating Ideas programme, a process we had begun back in the summer of 2016. However, much to…

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Why Ageing without children is different

Guest blog by Joy Anderson, member of AWOC facebook group Care and my own destiny was not something I thought about that much before the birth of AWOC although I had been acutely aware that not having children meant society and my family treated me differently. What I have learned from this group is that…

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